A study published by the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine shows clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension and cardiovascular risk in pregnant women. Below is a press release from the American Thoracic Society.

 

Replacing biomass and kerosene cookstoves used throughout the developing world with clean-burning ethanol stoves may reduce hypertension and cardiovascular risk in pregnant women, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

In “Randomized Controlled Ethanol Cookstove Intervention and Blood Pressure in Pregnant Nigerian Women,” researchers report that the frequency of developing hypertension and diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) were decreased in pregnant women who cooked with ethanol, rather than with traditional cookstoves fueled by wood or kerosene. Systolic blood pressure (the top number) did not change significantly.

“Although previous studies found that exposure to household air pollution increased the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, no randomized, controlled trial had investigated whether clean-burning fuel would reduce the incidence of hypertension in pregnant women,” said lead study author Christopher O. Olopade, MD, MPH, professor of medicine and family director of international programs at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine.